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When does the school year end?

When does the school year end?

MARIETTA, Ga. -- The last day of school is right around the corner for Cobb County students.

Public schools will dismiss for the summer on Thursday, May 24.

Marietta City Schools will end the school year a day later -- Friday, May 25.

The last days of school in other metro Atlanta districts are staggered throughout the second half of May. They include:

Wednesday, May 16
Clarke County

Thursday, May 17
Hall County

Friday, May 18
Bartow County
Clayton County
Fulton County

Tuesday, May 22
Atlanta Public Schools
Barrow County

Wednesday, May 23
Carroll County
Gwinnett County
Newton County

Thursday, May 24
Decatur City Schools
DeKalb County
Rockdale County

Atlanta Opera High School Opera Institute to give concert

Atlanta Opera High School Opera Institute to give concert

ATLANTA -- The 11 talented local students who participated in this year's Atlanta Opera High School Opera Institute will give a special concert next month.

The institute, which is one of only a few programs of its kind in the U.S., puts high school students through a rigorous audition process and offers eight months of workshops, vocal coaching and other courses for young people who are interested in pursuing music careers.

In the three years the Atlanta Opera has offered the program, 11 of its graduates have gone on to study music at universities and conservatories across the country.

Cobb teachers 'frustrated' with district spending

MARIETTA, Ga. -- Cobb County teachers are frustrated that the district is spending almost $500,000 on a conference that only a handful of teachers will get to attend. 

Many teachers believe that the money should go toward the district's $62 million budget deficit, especially at a time when the district is considering cutting 350 positions and implementing five mandatory furlough days. 

The conference will highlight success stories from the district and will share them with school systems from all over the country. 

"Teachers would rather have jobs than staff development," said a representative from Cobb County Public Schools. "Frustration is the right word. There isn't much trust left between the rank-and-file teacher and the Central Office."

The representative said the spending would further erode that relationship. 

Ga. high school students take longer to earn diplomas

ATLANTA -- A new method of calculating graduation rates reveals that more high school students are dropping out than had been previously counted and some of them are taking five or even six years to earn a diploma.

According to reports the new formula was released last week. It shows that Georgia's 2011 graduation rate dropped 13 percentage points using the calculation, to 67.4 percent.

RELATED | Compare graduation rates by school

Ordinance change allows limited fire lane parking at schools

Ordinance change allows limited fire lane parking at schools

 

Cobb County's fire lane ordinance was recently amended to include a provision for student pick-up at schools. Enforcement of this new provision begins Monday, April 9.

The ordinance will allows a vehicle to be located in a fire lane for 30 minutes prior to the afternoon school end time and 30 minutes after the school end time, as long as a driver is behind the wheel. School end times are available on the Cobb County School District Web site, cobbk12.org.

The ordinance change applies to private schools as well. Stopping or parking a vehicle in a fire lane at any other time is prohibited, unless passengers are actively loading or unloading.

Fire lanes can be identified by "No Parking Fire Lane" signage and/or red curbing. Fire lane violations will result in fines of $135. 

Nearly 90 metro Atlanta schools near bottom of barrel

Nearly 90 metro Atlanta schools near bottom of barrel

ATLANTA -- The Georgia Department of Education has released a list of 156 schools labeled as "focus" schools under the state's new accountability system.

The schools, many of which are in metro Atlanta, are one step above the state's worst performing schools, called "priority" schools, which were released last week. The "focus" schools are ones with a graduation rate of less than 60 percent over two years or have large gaps between the highest and lowest achieving subgroup of students on campus.

Subgroups can be determined by race, special needs and family income.

The state was one of 10 to win waivers last month from the federal No Child Left Behind law.

Bill would revoke bonuses for teachers caught cheating

Bill would revoke bonuses for teachers caught cheating

ATLANTA -- A Senate committee has passed a bill that would revoke bonuses for Georgia teachers who cheat on standardized tests.

The Democratic-backed legislation was approved unanimously by the Senate education committee Monday. It now goes to the full Senate for a vote before heading to the governor's desk.

Under current policy, teachers can receive bonuses or incentive pay based on the standardized test scores of their students.

The bill stems from last year's cheating scandal in Atlanta Public Schools.

A state investigation in July revealed widespread cheating by educators in nearly half of the Atlanta's 100 schools dating to 2001. In all, nearly 180 teachers and principals were accused of giving answers to students or changing responses once the tests had been completed.